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Our KI Library is as old as KI. The founding members began the collection over 50 years ago, and it has expanded over the years. The library is maintained by a dedicated group of KI congregants.

We have a children’s collection located in the Early Childhood Center which is supported completely by donations to the Donald Goldberg Memorial Fund and the community.

Our Adult collection is located next to the sanctuary and contains an extensive range of Judaica. It is supported by the Library Fund. Donations to these two funds are greatly appreciated and well used. We encourage you to make a donation today.

The library works on the honor system so you don’t have to worry about whether we’re open when you come.  Just pull the card out of the book you’re checking out, fill out the card with the date and your name and phone number and leave the card in the front of the box on the library “book truck” (the book truck is on your left as you leave the library). Please return the book within a month by placing it on the same book truck (the library committee volunteers will take care of checking the book in and reshelving it.)

our ki collections

- The Adult Collection is based on the Elaza Classification system for Judaica libraries. The complete card catalog is located on the computer in the middle carrel (on your left as you enter the library).

 Reference books are noted by the letter R before the call number and on the spine of the books. Reference books are at the back of the library. Please do NOT remove a reference book from the library.

– The Fiction collection is listed by initials of author’s last name and is found by the door to the patio toward the back of the library.

– The Non-Fiction collection is organized as follows:
001-099 Bible and Biblical Studies
100-199 Classical Judaica: Halakhah & Midrash
200-299 Jewish Observances & Practices (includes holidays, baby naming, weddings, B’nai Mitzvah)
300-399 Jewish Education
400-499 Hebrew, Jewish Languages & Sciences (includes Yiddish)
500-599 Jewish Literature
600-699 The Jewish Community: Society & Arts (including Women Studies)
700-799 Jewish History, Geography & Biography
800-899 Israel & Zionism

A complete listing of the library catalog is on the computer in the middle carrel on the left as you enter the library. Instructions for the use of the catalog are on the bulletin board above the computer. There are guides on the shelves directing you to the numbers/subjects as indicated in the catalog.

books On Social Justice, As Recommended By Rabbi Reuben

July 2019 - December 2019

If you attended or are attending the Social Justice Book Club on March 4 for its discussion of The Common Good by Robert B. Reich, you may be inspired to explore the topics discussed in greater depth on your own.  If so, Rabbi Reuben has assembled the following list of books in the KI Library which can deepen your understanding and knowledge of the issues discussed.  The library has many more books on ethics and social justice, so be sure to explore the collection while you’re there.

Righteous Indignation, A Call for Justice 

Rabbis, intellectuals and activists discuss the relationship between Judaism and social justice and argue that American Jewry must move beyond "mitzvah days" and other occasional service programs and dedicate itself to systemic change in the United States, Israel and throughout the world.  (136.4)

Jewish Choices, Jewish Voices: Power edited by Rabbi Elliot N. Dorff and Louis E. Newman

This volume in this ethics series deals with one of the most critical moral issues of our time: how do we use power once we’ve gained it? The book includes essays by contributor, including former U.S. Representative Henry Waxman, NBC Universal Television-West Coast President Marc Graboff and author and scholar James Diamond. (136.4/Dorff) 

Jewish Choices, Jewish Voices: War and National Security by Eliot N. Dorff and Dany Ruttenberg

This volume in this ethics series deals with one of the most critical moral issues of our time: what is morally acceptable in times of war and the nation’s defense?  Contributors include Noam Chomsky, Lt. Col. Seth Milstein and political philosopher Michael Walzer. (136.4/Dorff) 

Jewish Choices, Jewish Voices: Social Justice edited by Rabbi Elliot N. Dorff and Dany Ruttenberg

This volume in this ethics series deals with our current social justice issues, including expanding healthcare coverage, the death penalty and affirmative action issues. Contributors include Jill Jacobs of Jewish Funds for Justice, Arthur Waskow, director of The Shalom Center, and TV commentator and UCLA law professor Laurie Levenson.  (136.4/Dorff) 

Moral Resistance and Spiritual Authority edited by Seth M. Limmer and Jonah Dov Posner

In the This 2018 book explores the Jewish obligation to bring justice to the world. The essays in this collection use Jewish text and tradition to explore women's health, LGBTQ rights, healthcare, racial justice, speaking truth to power and community organizing. (136.4/Lim)

Organizational Ethics and Economic Justice by David A. Teutsch

This volume in the Guide to Jewish Practice series looks at business ethics, not-for-profit ethics and economic justice. It covers topics such as the meaning of work, obligations of employers and employees and of buyers and sellers and competition and cooperation. (220/Teu)

Community, Gemilut Hesed and Tikun Olam by David A. Teutsch

This book provides a fresh exploration of community, interpersonal caring and acts for the betterment of the world and looks at how simple acts help change the world. (220/Teu)

Bioethics by David A. Teutsch 

Another volume in this series by David Teutsch explores current medical ethical issues and asks the question: how much can society intrude on an individual’s own health autonomy? (136.75/Teu)

Ethics of Speech by David A. Teutsch

InThis book explores language’s enormous power – how it shapes every individual’s life and its capacity to build and destroy trust, create and devastate relationships, fuel rivalry and bring peace. It also looks at ways we use speech – oral, written and digital – and how that speech can build or destroy our communities. (136.75/Teu)

January- June 2019 Recommendations 

 

There are a lot of things going on in the United States now. Perhaps this is a good time to figure out our Jewish history and place in this country.  This has been a subject of ongoing scrutiny since Jews first arrived in the U.S. Below are some books from the KI Library that might help with your study:

Volume I: A Time for Planting: The First Migration, 1654-1820 by Eli Faber.

In the autumn of 1654, 23 Jews aboard the bark Sainte Catherine landed at the town of New Amsterdam to establish the first permanent Jewish settlement in North America. In A Time for Planting, Eli Faber recounts these earliest days of Jewish life in America, as Jews from Lisbon to Amsterdam to London extended the wanderings of their centuries-old diaspora.  This is the first volume in a series we have in the library.  Read them all. (771.1 FAB)

The Jews in America by Arthur Hertzberg. 

A controversial examination of the Jewish ''success story" in American that questions notions of identity, assimilation and ethnicity. (771 HER)

The American Jewish Album 1654 to the Present by Allon Schoener 

Over 500 illustrations document the Jewish contribution to American politics, commerce, industry, finance, labor, and the arts and highlight this survey of daily life and great Jewish personalities. (770)

The Secret War Against the Jews by John Loftus and Mark Aarons. 

Using thousands of previously top-secret documents and interviews with hundreds of current and former spies, Loftus and Aarons, both veteran investigators, Nazi-hunters and authors, present a compelling case that numerous Western countries, especially the United States and Great Britain, have conducted repeated and willful spying missions on Palestine and, later, Israel over many decades. (772 LOF)

HThThe Rest of Us by Stephen Birmingham.  Birmingham, better known for Our Crowd about the arrival of German Jews in New York, writes now about the wave of Eastern European Jewish immigrants who swept into New York in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by way of Ellis Island.  Not welcomed by the settled German Jews, the new arrivals were tough, passionate, and determined, and in no time they were moving up from the ghetto tenements of New York’s Lower East Side to make their marks and their fortunes across the country in a variety of fields, from media and popular music to fashion, motion pictures, and even organized crime. (771.5  BIR)

The Downtown Jews by Ronald Sanders.  A history of the 1880s through World War II told mostly from the standpoint of the Jewish Forward. (771.5 SAN)

Tough Jews by Rich Cohen.  Tough Jews traces a generation of Jewish gangsters from New York City’s Lower East Side to its Upper East Side. This is a (sometimes) gruesome but funny history of the Jewish gangster. You can almost hear the squeal of tires and the rattle of gunfire as you read. (770.9  COH)

The Deadliest Lies by Abraham H. Foxman.  The former head of the Anti-Defamation League shows how old stereotypes associated with the most virulent forms of bigotry have been resurfacing and taking subtle new forms, particularly around Israel and the so-called “Jewish Lobby.” (770.9 FOX)

HTJews and the New American Scene by Seymour Martin Lipset and Earl Raab.  The authors discuss the Jewish success and acceptance in the United States, as well as the problems of assimilation and the erosion of Jewish identity. (770.9 LIP)

The New Country: Jewish Immigrants in America by Abraham Shulman.  Over a period of 20 years around the turn of the century, over 2 million Jews left Eastern Europe to come to the United States.  This book gives a picture of what they did when they got here and how they adapted to their new country. (771.5 SH)

Number Our Days by Barbara Myerhoff.  When noted anthropologist Myerhoff received a grant to explore the process of aging, she decided to study some elderly Jews from Venice, California, rather than to report on a more exotic people. The story of the rituals and lives of these remarkable old people will enthrall you. (777.1 Myerhoff)

Profiles in American Judaism by Marc Lee Raphael.  This book provides perspective on the historical development of the different branches of American Judaism. (770 RA)

HThe TaChutzpah by Alan M. DershowitzDershowitz wrestles with the ideas of what it means to be a Jew in America today. (770.9 DER)

Philadelphia Jewish Life 1940-1985 edited by Murray Friedman.  This book contains over 250 illustrations - from the Urban Archives at Temple University and the Philadelphia Jewish archives at the Balch Institute – and 14 essays on Jewish life in the urban Eastern city of Philadelphia from 1940-1985. (774.3 Fr)

Wed, October 23 2019 24 Tishrei 5780